Select Projects

Upcoming in fall 2015…

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Sister Sylvester‘s The Fall: A Performative Screening, “Under Construction” Series at the Park Avenue Armory, November 12, 2014

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More than two years prior to the performance, director Kathryn Hamilton became obsessed with an apocryphal story: that British director Peter Whitehead’s seldom seen 1968 pseudo-documentary The Fall inspired the 1974 student occupations in Athens that led to the collapse of the Greek junta. Based on interviews with leaders of the Columbia University occupation by the SDS in 1968 (captured in the film), Peter Whitehead himself, and tantalizing trails leading back to obscure underground events in 1970s Greece, Hamilton pursued a story that centered on the relationship between art and politics, utopianism and nihilism, and the legacy of a now obscure filmmaker who, from humble roots, placed himself at the center of ’60s Swinging London–the ultimate outsider at the the center of it all: videographer for the Rolling Stones, inventor of the music video, collaborator and confidante of everyone from Niki de Saint Phalle to Kathy Acker and beyond.

Director, Writer, Narrator: Kathryn Hamilton
Dramaturg and Chicken Handler: Jeremy M. Barker
Videography: Cyrus Moshrefi
Performed by Kathryn Hamilton, Cyrus Moshrefi, and Kelsea Martin

 

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Sister Sylvester‘s The Maids’ The Maids, Abrons Arts Center, October 31-November 8, 2014

Photo by Maria Baranova

Photo by Maria Baranova

In The Maids’ The Maids, director Kathryn Hamilton and artists from her company Sister Sylvester have partnered with domestic household workers in New York City to devise a response to Jean Genet’s notorious 1947 one-act The Maids.

Using Genet’s central device of maids role-playing as their employer to expose the subtle (and not-so-subtle) humiliations involved in domestic labor and the experience of immigrants, the performance invites contemporary domestics to use the theatrical space to stage experiences from their own lives. What emerges is a portrait of two separate New York Cities: a city that serves and a city that is served. One is for the increasingly affluent English speakers who can afford domestic workers, while the other—separated by language—is that of precarious laborers, often undocumented immigrants, who serve them. In the waste and excess of this rich people’s playground, who cleans up the mess?

Navigating the intersecting fault lines of labor, language and power, the show presents stories and experiences culled from the experiences of our collaborators in the their time as domestic workers, which are used to give depth and perspective to Genet’s celebration of ritual transgression through a “maids’ rebellion.” The show is performed in the native languages of the performers: English, Spanish, and Portuguese.

Director: Kathryn Hamilton
Dramaturg: Jeremy M. Barker
Sculptural Objects: Juan Betancurth
Lighting Design: Bruce Steinberg
Assistant Lighting Designer: Anthony Tornambene
Master Electrician: Eileen Goddard
Video design: Brian Oh
Scenic Design: Damon Pelletier

Performed by: Laudiceia Calixto, Terence Mintern, Sofia Ortega, Rita Oliveira, Isabel Sanchez

Stage Manager: Emily Wright
Assistant Stage Manager: Giovanna Almeida

Additional translations by Maria Cuatero

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Sister Sylvester‘s Dead Behind These Eyes, Sing Sing Karaoke (off-site, Abrons Art Center) August 31-September 19, 2014

Daniel Kublick, audience member, and  Jeremy M. Barker in Sister Sylvester's "Dead Behind These Eyes." Photo by Maria Baranova

Daniel Kublick, audience member, and Jeremy M. Barker in Sister Sylvester’s “Dead Behind These Eyes.” Photo by Maria Baranova

Dead Behind These Eyes is a performance in a karaoke room about pop music, love, and apathy. Three characters rail against the world, and mourn the big, bold important lives they were supposed to live, drowning their sorrows in booze, song, sex, and cigarettes. Using text inspired by John Osborn’s iconic play of dissatisfied youth, ‘Look back In Anger’, alongside lyrics from Britney Spears, Jeff Buckley, Prince and others, this piece explores political and social participation through the microcosm of the karaoke parlor. Dead Behind These Eyes is a co-production with Abrons Art Center. It was performed in a workshop showing at Dixon Place in 2012, and again at Grace Exhibition Space later that year. Sing Sing karaoke hosted a two week workshop of the piece in April 2014 with an open rehearsal/ showing at the end of that time.

Dead Behind These Eyes is made possible in part with public funds from the Manhattan Community Arts Fund, supported by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and administered by Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

Director: Kathryn Hamilton
Dramaturg: Jeremy M. Barker
Video Design: Brian Oh
Performances by: Brandt Adams, Daniel Kublick, and Lori Parquet

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Everyone’s a Critic,” public event by Culturebot, On the Boards (Seattle) March 7, 2013

Photo by Leah Schrager

Photo by Leah Schrager

Everyone’s a critic! Or are they? What’s the difference between having an opinion and having a conversation? How do we move beyond “love it/hate it” reviewing and into real dialogue?

Join Culturebot at On the Boards for a one-night-only interactive performance event that seeks to answer these questions. Culturebot’s Jeremy Barker and Andy Horwitz will enlist some of Seattle’s best and brightest artists, critics, funders, administrators and audience members to begin breaking down contemporary performance and how we talk about it. Everyone’s A Critic will launch their Citizen Critic Project, a national initiative to activate and inspire public critical conversations on the arts and society.

Featuring Tonya Lockyer, Brendan Kiley, Matthew Richter, Jose Amador, Serge Gart, Tommer Peterson and others.

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 Ephemeral Evidence” group show curated by Culturebot, Exit Art (NYC) April 17-21, 2012

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Ephemeral Evidence consists of a series of collaborative explorations between writers and performing artists to investigate the relationship between practice and skill in performance-making, object-making and context. We propose an experiment in which objects are created directly from the result of the performing artist’s practice – their skilled application of learned techniques. Does the object, existing as residue of the ephemeral event, gain meaning as document or value object in itself? Both? How does the critical dialogue around the performance process and object inform our perception and valuation of the art? Organized by Andy Horwitz, I curated two of the guest performers: Arturo Vidich, who produced Road Trip, a sculpture produced through a performance entitled Nobody is Perfect But You Come Close, and Witness Relocation’s Giant Yves Klein All-Out Attack, a wrestling match inspired by Klein’s Anthropométries (video).

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